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17th Century Tokens : Southwark-3 in Southwark

W Numbers refer to Williamson's  Trade Tokens Issued in the Seventeenth Century in England, Wales and Ireland, (1891)

See also other Counties issuing 17th Century Tokens

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W53: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (1651)
O  A spaniel dog
AT THE WATER SPANEL
R  I I I
IN SOVTHWARKE 1651 I I I
Image not available
W54: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  The Royal Arms
EDWARD IOYE
R  E E I
IN SOVTHWARKE E E I
Image not available
W56: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (1649)
O  A key, H L
AT THE GOLDEN KEY H L
R  The Grocers' Arms
IN SOVTHWARK 1649
Image not available
The Golden Key was No. 104. High Street. At this house lived a chemist, named Elliotson, whose grandson became a celebrated physician, Dr. Elliotson, F.R.S., who attended Thackeray, and to whom, in gratitude, was dedicated "Pendennis."
W57: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  The Royal Arms
IAMES LANE AT THE
R  I A L
IN SOVTHWARK I A L
Image not available
W58: Southwark, Southwark (Uncertain): (Date Unknown)
O  A spur
HEN LANGLEY SALTER
R  H M L
IN SOVTHWARKE H M L
Image not available
The Spur Inn is mentioned as early as 1542. A fire occurred at Southwark in 1667, which commenced on these premises, and burnt some of the out-buildings. It is probably alluded to by Pepys under date April 29, 1667, where he says: "A great fire at Southwarke. I up to the leads and saw it. We at that distance saw an engine play and the water go out of it, being moonlight."

In 1720 the inn is described as "pretty well resorted unto by waggons," and a few country carriers even now call there, who yet, in 1886, seem to cling to this, one of the last of their ancient places of call in the Borough. --[R. and N., 221.]

W59: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (1661)
O  A fleur-de-lys
THOMAS LENTON AT THE
R  T H L
IN SOVTHWARKE 1661 T H L
Image not available
W60: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (1651)
O  A fleur-de-lys
THOMAS LENTON AT THE
R  T H L
IN SOVTHWARKE 1651 T H L
Image not available
W61: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  The Woodmongers' Arms
WILLIAM LONGE WOOD
R  W I L
MOVNGER SOVTHWARKE W I L
Image not available
W64: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  A fox
FRANCIS MORTIMER
R  F E M
IN SOVTHWARKE F E M
Image not available
W66: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  A thistle-flower and leaf
THOMAS NEWSVM
R  T N
IN SOVTHWARK T N
Image not available
W67: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  Three hats
3 HATS NAGS HEAD
R  I I N
ALEY IN SOVTHWARKE I I N
Image not available
In 1542 the Nag's Head is termed the Horse Hede. In 1634 it had its court of small tenements. In 1720 we are told that the buildings are old and sorry. Andrew Ducrow, the great equestrian performer, is said to have been born at the Nag's Head on May 12, 1796. His parents had put up there, having arrived from Germany on the same day. George Colman, the younger, in his "Poor Gentleman," a comedy produced at Covent Garden, 1801, makes the farmer say:

"I be come from Lunnon, you see; I warrant I smell of smoke like the Nag's Head Chimney in the Borough. Freshest news? Why, hops have a heavy sale; wheat and malting samples command a brisk market; new tick beanes am risen two shillings per quarter, and white and grey peas keep up their prices." --[R. and N., 222-223.]

W68: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  Three hats, W P
IN SOVTHWORKE W P
R  [Blank]
[No Legend]
Image not available
W70: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (1655)
O  A beacon
IAMES PITMAN IN
R  I I P
SOVTHWARKE 1655 I I P
Image not available
In the High Street in 1723 was the Beacon, a public-house so called. Its exact position is shown by its removal for the construction of a better gateway to the hospital. Thomas Guy and another generous governor were just now spending much money in improvements and new wards there. The sign may have had reference to the well-known telegraph tower close at hand or to a fire-beacon. I would remark, too, that a considerable part of Tooley Street by the church was probably so far back as the fifteenth century known as the Bergheny, apparently from its name derived from Burgh kenning, meaning a watch-tower, which might reasonably be held to imply a beacon. --[R. and N., 118.]
W71: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (1664)
O  A roll of tobacco
IOHN NELSON AT YE
R  I N
IN SOVTHWARK 1664 I N
Image not available
W72: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (1663)
O  A mop
WILL PALMER AT
R  W I P
IN SOVTHWARKE 1663 W I P
Image not available
W73: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  The Weavers' Arms
IOHN POORE VITLER
R  I M P
IN SOVTHWARKE I M P
Image not available
W75: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  An ape on horseback
RICHARD POORE
R  R E P
IN SOVTHWARKE R E P
Image not available
W76: Southwark, Southwark (Farthing): (Date Unknown)
O  The Mercers' Arms
RICHARD PERKINS
R  R M P
IN SOVTHWARKE R M P
Image not available
W78: Southwark, Southwark (Uncertain): (Date Unknown)
O  Bust of Henry VIII facing
AT THE KINGS HEAD IN
R  W P
SOVTHWARKE GROCER W P
Image not available
The King's Head was one of the important inns of Southwark. Its sign was originally the Pope's Head, but at the time of the Papal repression it changed its name. In 1534 the Abbot of Waverly writes that he will be at "the Pope's Head in Southwark." Eight years afterwards the inn was marked in the Record Office Map as the "Kynges Hed." The property was in the possession of the family of Mr J Eliot Hodgkin, F.S.A., for some generations, and from a deed of 1559, which Mr Hodgkin possesses, the following statement has been gleaned:

In 1559 the deed is drawn between John Gresham and John White bargaining for a certain sum of money with Thomas Cure for the inn "formerly known as the Pope's Hed now as the Kynge's Hed, abutting on the highway called Longe-Southwarke."

After this it is found that in 1588 the property passes to the Humbles, and in 1647 to Humble Lord Ward. The inn was burnt down in 1676, and after the fire the tenant, Mary Duffield, appealed to the Court of Judicature against the harsh treatment of her superiour landlord. The decision, which is contained in the Fire Decrees of 1677 in the Guildhall, settled that the tenant should build a good substantial inn and buildings, and that her rent be reduced from £66 to £38, and her tenure extended to forty-eight years.

In 1720 the inn was "well built, handsome, and enjoying a good trade, and had picturesque wooden galleries on both sides of the yard, but in 1885 the last remaining portion of the east side was pulled down." --[R. and N., 122-127.]

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